Romans in Andalucia

This is a journey through Roman Andalucia. Like Pliny the Elder, we have created an itinerary that takes in the best examples of all things Roman, from their towns and their attention to the detail of town planning to their aqueducts, theatres, amphitheatres and, the feature they are most known for, their roads. Many of the sites we visit are now capital cities of the provinces, Seville, Cadiz, Jaen, Granada, Cordoba and Malaga, whilst others are lesser-known towns that have outstanding examples of some feature of Roman life like Rio Tinto, Carmona, Jimena de la Frontera, Ecija, Acinipo and Baelo Claudia. The whole series of articles is set in an historical context and chronology that takes us from Rome’s first venture into Spain in 218 BC, to their departure in 409 AD. In the guise of Byzantines they reappeared in 552 AD and established Spania, a territory that took in most of Andalucia and part of Murcia. They were to remain until supplanted by the Visigoths in 624 AD.